This kit enables partner cancer societies, hospitals, diagnostic centers and NGOs to provide Niramai automated breast cancer screening services for unlimited monthly screenings to triage the population and identify patients with high suspicion of breast malignancy

Niramai has launched a new initiative in the month of October to fight breast cancer. Now, community health workers, NGOs and health workers conducting health talks can also conduct screening camps together. This new initiative offers ‘Easy Launch Kits’ for breast cancer screening as a special ‘Starter Kit’ for socially conscious organisations, enabling them to provide accurate breast cancer screening services by spending just Rs 1000 per day.

This kit enables partner cancer societies, hospitals, diagnostic centers and NGOs to provide Niramai automated breast cancer screening services for unlimited monthly screenings to triage the population and identify patients with high suspicion of breast malignancy. This limited-time offer, with bookings available until October 31 on a first-come, first-served basis, will help make screenings accessible to more women.

Dr. Geeta Manjunath, CEO and founder of Niramai, said: “It is very important to encourage more and more women to get screened every year to enable early detection and early treatment, which not only saves lives but also reduces treatment costs. Early stage detection causes a person to return to normal life very quickly. Because our test provides a “locker room” experience where no one sees or touches the women during the test, we have received great feedback from both urban and rural women. There are many community organizations that actually have a similar mission of early cancer detection, but they have not been able to provide free screening services due to the exorbitant cost of renting a mobile mammogram. With the launch of our starter kit, we are building a collaborative platform to make screenings accessible and scalable to save thousands of women. »

With this launch, Niramai hopes to positively impact the lives of more women by encouraging them to get tested at the nearest diagnostic center, hospital or NGO.

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