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Des siècles après que la plague noire a ravagé le monde mediéval, l’héritage genetic de la maladie still affects people today, selon une nouvelle étude.

The genes that helped individuals to survive the bubonic plague in the 14th century make certain individuals more susceptible to contracting certain diseases in today’s modern world.

L’étude, publiée mercredi dans l’hebdomadaire britannique revue Naturese concentrate on the way that the germs of the past can continue to play a role in the immune system.

Il ya des siècles, the black plague devastated the peoples of North Africa, Europe and the Middle East. The plague is considered one of the deadliest events in the history of humanity, as it killed between 30% and 50% of the population of these regions at the time.

THE COLORADO REPORT OF THE FLEAS AND ANIMALS INFECTED BY THE PLASTE, BLAMES THE DISEASE FOR THE DEATH OF A 10-YEAR-OLD CHILD

The bubonic plague destroyed the populations of three continents in the medieval era via diseased rats and fleas.
(AP Photo/Rick Rycroft, File)

Researchers from the University of Chicago, the McMaster University in Ontario and the Institut Pasteur in Paris analyzed the remains of 200 people who died in London and Denmark before, during and after the bubonic plague infected the region.

L’étude indicates that the genes that protect individuals from the plague augment the presence of deadly mutations over several generations and are linked to the autoimmune diseases of today. These problems consist of Crohn’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and lupus.

“Un système imunitaire hyperactif a peut-être été foridable dans le passé, mais dans l’environnement d’aujourd’hui, il pourrait ne pas être aussi utile,” said Hendrik Poinard, author and author de l’étude, selon CBS News.

One of the main authors of this research, Luis Barreiro, declared that this was the first scientific demonstration proving that the black plague had a role to play in the modern evolution of the immune system.

LES ZOOS AUX ÉTATS-UNIS RÉAGISSENT À L’ÉPIDÉMIE DE GRIPPE AVIAIRE ALORS QUE LES TAUX D’INFECTION MONTENT

Cependant, dans le monde d’aujourd’hui, la peste bubonic autrefois mortelle est un vestige du passé, avec quelques milliers de cas surgissant dans le monde chaque année. Between 2010 and 2015, 584 people died of the disease, many of whom live in Pérou, Congo and Madagascar, according to the World Health Organization.

The disease is capable of being propagated by infected fleas and rats and arrived in the United States at the beginning of the 20th century via steam boats.

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